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ROAR: The Most Dangerous Movie Ever Made

ROAR: The Most Dangerous Movie Ever Made

“There’s never been a film like ROAR – and there never will be again!”

In the 1970s, Noel Marshall (producer on THE EXORCIST) and his wife (THE BIRDS’ Tippi Hedren) had a passion for very large cats; in fact, they famously shared their home with over 150 of them. It wasn’t a huge leap to make a movie about it. Marshall made it a family affair, enlisted Hedren, her daughter (Melanie Griifth) and others to star in ROAR, which has achieved a cult-status in the years since its initial release in 1981. Hedren once said of ROAR, “This was probably one of the most dangerous films that Hollywood has ever seen. It’s amazing no one was killed.”

Friday April 17
Doors 9:00pm / Movie 9:30 -> Buy tickets here

Friday April 24
Doors 6:00 / Movie 6:30 -> Buy tickets here

Tuesday April 28
Doors 9:00 / Movie 9:15 –> Buy tickets here

Tickets $10 advance/ $12 at the door
Must be 19+ w/ID for bar service

ROAR (1981, Noel Marshall / 102 mins ) | Jungle beasts assemble in flocks to invade an otherwise quiet home where they chase humans up and down stairways and from one room to another.

“Tippi Hedren, and her Academy Award Nominated daughter and co-star, Melanie Griffith star in the most amazing film with big cats ever made! Born Free had very few lions interacting with people. The real life Marshall family (Tippi, Melanie, Noel and sons John and Jerry) had to live with the 150 lions, tigers, leopards, etc. in order to make this film. That was not the plan in the beginning. Originally, Tippi and Noel came up with the idea of making a movie with lions after a trip to Africa. They wanted to simply “rent” Hollywood trained lions. They interviewed many and their trainers. They were told the only way to make a film like they wanted to was to get a few of their own.

That’s where it got out of control. And when it became a true labor of love. The whole family fell in love with all the cats they started raising. They did this in their house in Sherman Oaks, Calif. In the beginning until they got caught. Then they bought a ranch in Acton, Calif. Where it is legal, if you get all the permits, to raise these animals. Then they got tigers. Not needed for the film, but very amazing. Then elephants. Cougars. Cheetahs. You get the idea!

The making of ROAR spanned a period of more than 10 years, including 5 years of photography. It involved the remarkable talents of a crew of more than 100 dedicated men and women as well as the participation of more than 150 untrained lions, tigers, leopards and cheetahs. Add to that two elephants, twelve flamingos and eight ostriches… and the end product is nothing less than amazing.

Needless to say, a production of this sort places special demands on both cast and crew. Use the links on this page to learn about this incredible film and about the amazing people who made ROAR possible. Learn about the extraordinary talents of actress Tippi Hedren, Melanie Griffith and about award-winning cinematographer Jan De Bont, whose career in the United States began right here, on the set of ROAR.

No animals were hurt during the filming, but over 70 people were injured, including all cast members except Mativo. Not the animals fault, but the fault of the project. We’ve now learned that these are wild animals. If you do what the family did in the film, it’s not “if” you’ll get bitten, it’s “when”!”

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