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Oldboy (2004)

Oldboy (2004)

The Rio Theatre felt it was high time to celebrate one of cinema’s most stylishly inventive filmmakers, South Korea’s Park Chan-wook, with a Friday night double feature highlighting something new (his latest offering, 2016’s THE HANDMAIDEN) and an old chestnut (2004’s OLDBOY, which also happens to be one of our most-frequently requested titles.) See one, or see ’em both!

A violent, offbeat, and somewhat Shakesperean tale of punishment and vengeance, OLDBOY (“Oldeuboi”) screened in competition at the 2004 Cannes Film Festival, winning the highly coveted Grand prix award. The film is centered on Oh Dae-su (Choi Min-sik), a husband and father with a reputation for womanizing. For reasons he doesn’t understand, he finds himself held captive and locked in a prison cell with no idea of his crime or who has put him there. With just a small television as his only link to the outside world and a daily ration of fried dumplings as his only sustenance, he struggles to keep his mind and body intact. When he learns through a news report that his wife has been killed, he begins a long and difficult project of digging an escape tunnel with a pair of chopsticks. Before he can finish Oh Dae-su is released, with as little explanation as when he was locked up, and he’s soon given a wad of money and a cellular phone by a bum on the street. Emotionally stunted but physically strong after 15 years in prison, he struggles to unravel the secret of who is responsible for locking him up, what happened to his wife and daughter – and how to best get revenge against his captors.

“Both brutal and lyrical, writer-director Park Chan-wook’s existential nail-biter has torture scenes that will have you avoiding dentists, sushi bars and badly appointed hotel rooms.” (New York Daily News)

“Shakespearean in its violence, OLDBOY also calls up nightmare images of spiritual and physical isolation that are worthy of Samuel Beckett or Dostoyevsky.” (Wall Street Journal)


Park Chan-wook Double Feature! Why not make it a Park Chan-wook double feature? See both THE HANDMAIDEN and OLDBOY for one sweet price.

THE HANDMAIDEN
Doors 5:30 pm | Movie 6:00  pm
Single Film Tickets $10 advance HERE | $12 at the door.

Double Bill Tickets $13 advance HERE | $15 at the door

*Please note: Online sales for the double feature end at 5:00 pm. Tickets will stil be available for purchase at the door prior to the show.


OLDBOY

Doors 8:45 pm | Movie 9:15  pm
Single Film Tickets $10 advance HERE | $12 at the door

*Minors permitted in the balcony for both THE HANDMAIDEN and OLDBOY. (Please note: Both of these films are rated 18A.) Must be 19+ w/ID for bar service and main floor seating.
**Groupons and passes OK for any single film. Please redeem at the door.


THE HANDMAIDEN “Ah-Ga-Sse” (Park Chan-wook, 2016 / 145 mins / 18A / Korean with English subtitles) In 1930s Korea, in the period of Japanese occupation, a new girl (Sookee) is hired as a handmaiden to a Japanese heiress (Hideko) who lives a secluded life on a large countryside estate with her domineering Uncle (Kouzuki). But the maid has a secret. She is a pickpocket recruited by a swindler posing as a Japanese Count to help him seduce the Lady to elope with him, rob her of her fortune, and lock her up in a madhouse. The plan seems to proceed according to plan until Sookee and Hideko discover some unexpected emotions.

OLDBOY  “Oldeuboi” (Park Chan-wook, 2004 / 120 mins / 18A / Korean with English subtitles) An average man is kidnapped and imprisoned in a shabby cell for 15 years without explanation. He then is released, equipped with money, a cellphone and expensive clothes. As he strives to explain his imprisonment and get his revenge, Oh Dae-Su soon finds out that his kidnapper has a greater plan for him and is set onto a path of pain and suffering in an attempt to uncover the motive of his mysterious tormentor.

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